Tag Archive: snow


Snowdonia

Snowdonia

A short post, on Monday I took a walk in the snow in Snowdonia.  Due to ice and mist, I walked up the Miner’s Track to where in joins the Pyg Track, then retuned along the Pyg Track. This was generally a very easy walk, apart from the steep climb at the end of the Miner’s Track where it joins the Pyg Track.  This was steep, and as I was the one of first to climb in the morning, hidden in snow and slippy.  I hope to have the weather to get make it worthwhile getting to the top next time.

A few photos from the trip can be found here.

Photos from the walk are here, generally shot in Aperture Priority.  Panoramas shot handheld, merged in PT Gui. B&W conversion in Silver Efex Pro.

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360 Panorama of Campsite on Bleaklow

Having seen some pictures link of the B29 plane wreck on Bleaklow Moor, near Snake Pass, in the Peak District, I have wanted to take a look myself for a few months.

Leaving Birmingham after work on Friday, I took wanted to go straight to the crash site to camp for the night, so that I would be there for first light in the morning.

Campsite on Bleaklow

In the pitch black I followed the Pennine Way along the Devil’s Dyke for about 2 miles from the Snake Pass, not far from Glossop.  At the chosen point, at the top of Hern Cough I headed off the pass, across the moor towards the grid

reference I’d picked up from the internet.  This proved tricky, the land if full of dips and raised areas of grass, which make walking in a straight line impossible.  Normally one could pick a landmark in the right direction to head towards, but I’d left it until after dark before setting off, and in driving snow visibility was down to about 5 metres.  However using the Iphone’s GPS I was able to get in the approximate area of the plane, and find a hollow, out of the worst of the wind to camp for the night.

By morning, it had stopped snowing, and fortunately the mist was high enough to be able to see the surrounding moor.  Within 5 minutes I was able to find the plane.

Crash Site

I was surprised at the amount of wreckage, especially considering the plane crashed over 60 years ago in 1948.  I guess to the weather conditions, and the early start, I had the site to myself for about 2 hours (although I was joined by a passing white hare for a split second).

Due to the brightness of most frames, I set my camera to bracket +/- 1 stop in aperture priority mode.  Doing this allowed my to work quickly in the cold, knowing that for each scene, even i the meter was fooled by the light grey mist and cloud, and the white snow, I’d have a good exposure to work with when it came to processing.  Doing this saved me having to change too many settings, and so allowing me to keep my gloves on.  I wandered around the site first with a wide angle 11-22mm lens (22-44 35mm equivalent), then switched to a 40-150mm (80-300 35mm equivalent) to pick out some details.  I finished up with a second session with a wide angle. Again, I avoided changing the lens too many times, this allowed me to leave my back hidden behind a memorial stone and meant I minimised the times I had to stop in the cold. Generally, for the scenes with most white +1 stop was, as expected a good exposure, although for the close up shots, or shots with most dark wreckage, normal or -1 stop compensation was used for post processing.  Post processing was in Lightroom and then black and white conversion in Silver Efex Pro.

My waterproof trousers were very handy here, allowing me to lie and kneel on the snow without discomfort.

The memorial over the site reads:

“In Memory: Here lies the wreckage of B-29 Superfortress “Overexposed” of the 16th Photographic Reconnaissance Squadron, USAF which tragically crashed whilst descending through cloud on 3rd November 1948 killing all 13 crew members.

The Aircraft was on a routine flight from RAF Scampton to American AFB Burtonwood.  It is doubtful the crew ever saw the ground.”

Memorial

The most striking part of the site are the plane’s four engines.  These made great subjects, with their frosted up heat sinks and gears, and drive shafts (I guess?) poking out the back.

The only other recognisable (to me) part was the undercarriage. I was able to find a set of small wheels attached to some debris which I imagine were under the wing, and a far larger wheel, perhaps from under the fuselage.  The larger wheel amazingly seemed to have the remnants of a tyre still attached – 60 years old…

Debris

Debris

The rest of the wreckage was anonymous to me, just sections of twisted, torn and decayed metal.

I have tried to capture wider scene of the crash site, and also picked out a few details, such as the rivets and the memorials left, I guess last November for Remembrance Day.

No doubt if this accident had taken place in a more accessible place most of the wreckage would have been looted by now, as it is remains a fitting tribute to the 13 men who died in the crash.

A slideshow of the images in this set can be found here